Copper

Copper

A Natural trace metal found in our body that attracts peptides to nourish damaged skin.

Copper

Copper is an important ally in skin care as it works to hide the appearance of wrinkles and maintain youthful skin. Proteins serve many important roles within the body, including repairing damaged tissue and constructing new tissue. Peptides are small fragments of proteins instrumental to healthy skin. Copper, a trace metal found in the body’s cells, attracts these peptides and binds with them, forming substances known as copper peptides. In essence, copper acts as a conveyance, carrying nourishing protein to damaged skin.

Even often skeptical doctors are touting copper’s ability to combat the ravages of time. “Copper definitely plays an important role in maintaining healthy skin,” says dermatologist Joshua Zeichner, director of cosmetic and clinical research at Mount Sinai’s Department of Dermatology in New York. “It helps to develop collagen and elastin, which maintain the strength of the skin, and it promotes the production of skin-plumping hyaluronic acid.” (Translation: less sagging and fewer lines.) “It also has antibacterial and antifungal properties, which help prevent infections,” he adds, which is why it has been used in wound care since the ’60s (and shows high hopes for acne treatment too).

Today’s ingredient, copper, is nowhere near new. In fact, for thousands of years—all the way back to the ancient Egyptians—the element has been heralded as a “fountain of youth” of sorts. Now with the science to prove it, copper has more recently blossomed into the realm of modern skincare as the heavy hitter in various night creams, SPFs, serums, and hair restoration, mostly thanks to biochemist Dr. Loren Pickart.